Dover Architecture on Display with Coastal Trail

Dover Architecture on Display with Coastal Trail

Dover will soon have a new architectural coastal trail. The Dover Arts Development has already released news of the CHALKUP 21 which is a trail that will be located along the Strait of Dover. The 17-mile long coastal trail will stretch between Folkestone and Deal, connecting nine different buildings and public artworks that have been created in the coastal town over the course of the past 17 years.

In order to celebrate 21st century architecture and art in Dover, the trail will link them all up for visitors to see. Included in this is “The Wing” which is located at Capel Le Ferne and was created in 2015, the Samphire Hoe Education centre that was constructed in 2014, and “Three Waves” created in 2009 by Tonkin Liu on the Dover Esplanade.

For those interested in learning more about Dover and the surrounding area, especially the architecture and sculpture on offer, the trail will take two days to complete. Dover is known for being the busiest passenger port in Britain, therefore there are a great number of visitors passing through the town each day that could make the most of this Art Development trail. It has been estimated that in the region of 13 million cruise and ferry passengers travel through Dover, who could be missing out on the art available in the port town. It is hoped that the new coastal trail will also attract fans of contemporary architecture, walkers, cyclists and local residents.

The trail has been created through a collaboration between Dover Arts Development, the popular architect Charles Holland, Diederik Smet, Dover’s Destination Manager, the North Downs Way National Trail Manager, who is Peter Morris, Alice Bryant who managed the PR and Edda Jones, the graphic designer. The project is expected to run from April 2017 up until December 2018, with plaques, new sculptures, exhibitions and collaborations along the trail.

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